Perfect Tomato Sauce

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by Nick Doniger
from Sizzle Grove

Does the thought of making homemade tomato sauce conjure up an image of an elderly Italian grandmother simmering a big pot of homegrown pureed tomatoes on the back of the stove for hours in her rustic Italian countryside kitchen, a sparkle in her eye as she prepares a dozen dishes to make for all her hungry family members?  Well, find another image, because in real life, most people, including Italians, don’t quite have the time to stew and puree their own tomatoes.

by Nick Doniger
from Sizzle Grove

 


 

Does the thought of making homemade tomato sauce conjure up an image of an elderly Italian grandmother simmering a big pot of homegrown pureed tomatoes on the back of the stove for hours in her rustic Italian countryside kitchen, a sparkle in her eye as she prepares a dozen dishes to make for all her hungry family members?  Well, find another image, because in real life, most people, including Italians, don’t quite have the time to stew and puree their own tomatoes.

ATTENTION WORLD: TOMATO SAUCE DOES NOT TAKE ALL DAY TO MAKE.

That’s because there are great commercially available canned tomatoes all over the place in this day and age.  They’re available whole, pureed, crushed, or chopped.  If you have 20 minutes or so, you can make a zesty sauce way tastier than anything you’d get out of a jar. 

Note: for best results, buy tomatoes labeled “San Marzano” as long as they’re on sale.  They can get pretty pricey, so if that fails, the ones labeled “organic” are always great.

INGREDIENTS:

One 28 oz. can crushed tomatoes

One 28 oz. can tomato puree

2-3 cloves garlic, minced

2 tbsp olive oil

Dash red pepper flakes

1/2 tsp salt

1/4 tsp black pepper

1/2 tsp white sugar

1 cup chopped parsley (a significant amount, indeed)

STEPS:

1. In a medium saucepan, bring heat to medium.

2. Pour in olive oil, chopped garlic, and red pepper flakes.  Allow to cook a minute or two, until garlic lightly browns and releases a slightly toasty aroma.

3. Add tomatoes and stir to keep bubbling to a minimum, or your shirt will have dinner on it.  You’ll notice the olive oil won’t seem to want to incorporate into the tomatoes at first, but after a couple minutes, it will.

4. Add all other ingredients: salt, pepper, sugar, parsley.  Bring heat down to a medium simmer, and let it go for 10-15 minutes.  The redness of the sauce will deepen when it’s ready.

5. Do a taste test if you want, though you won’t need to.  It will be good.

6. Turn off heat.  Put sauce on stuff.  Eat that stuff.  That was really easy.

If you want to add an extra layer of flavor, add a handful of grated pecorino romano right at the end when you’re turning off the heat.

 

 

Nick Doniger is the creator and author of Sizzle Grove, a blog celebrating all that is barbecue and beer.  He is a blogger and online content writer with a degree in American Studies from the University of Connecticut.  Nick’s interest in barbecue stemmed from watching cooking shows and the subsequent purchase of a charcoal grill, plus a couple years of trial, error, and experimentation.  All recipes on his site were developed by him, unless noted otherwise.  His love of craft beer was spawned from frequent visits to his favorite bar at My Place restaurant in Newtown, Connecticut, and from his parents’ and friends’ influence.  In his spare time, Nick enjoys cooking and developing recipes, spending time with his girlfriend, singer Lauryn Linley, and writing his own music.

by & filed under Appetizers, Food.